What Type of Macro Photography Accessories do you Really Need?

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Macro Photography EquipmentIt’s not at all unusual for people to get bitten by the macro photography bug these days. Maybe you started off taking family photographs with your DLSR, and noticed the cool macro photographs that people share on social media sites or on photography websites, and decided that you wanted to try your hand at extreme close-up photography. There have been plenty of experienced macro photographers who started out in much the same way.

It can get a bit confusing, though, when you are ready to progress from simply zooming in on your subject and moving into the realm of real macro photography. There’s so much to learn, and so many different pieces of macro photography accessories and gear that you have to learn about. You start hearing about macro photography lenses, close up tubes, filters and all sorts of other photography equipment and it can be downright perplexing trying to figure out what each piece of equipment does.

Today’s macro photography lesson is all about helping you to make sense of the different pieces of photography equipment that you hear so much about. Watch the lesson and you will be a macro photography gear expert in no time…


To simplify things, you need to keep in mind the three basic pieces of equipment that this video talks about: macro lenses, extension tubes and macro filters. While it is true that all three of these pieces of photography equipment can help you to take great macro photographs, you must be clear on the strengths and weaknesses of all three. You may find that a simple filter is enough for your needs, or you may decide that you want to have all three in your photography gear bag to cover all the bases!

There’s no set rule that says you need all the macro photography accessories – a lens, or a filter or an extension tube. You may find that it’s easiest to review this video tutorial again and then to try out one or two of the pieces of gear discussed, before you progress on to purchasing more expensive gear. As a rule of thumb, a nice 105mm macro lens is more expensive than extension tubes or filters, so you might want to experiment with the more affordable gear before investing in an expensive macro lens.

Thanks for taking time out to watch this macro photography tutorial, please click on the Share button before you leave! Thanks!!

Other articles that you may be interested in –

1. Choosing a Diopter / Close Up Filter

2. Choosing an Extension Tube

3. Using Macro Bellows

4. Macro photography Technique – How to Reverse your Lens

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