Discover How to take Breathtaking Glass Macro Photographs

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Glass has an almost magical quality to it. Think about those brilliant stained glass windows you see on old churches, or the image of the mystic looking into a crystal ball to tell the future, and you’ll soon realize why so many people are fascinated with glass. If you enjoy the beauty, natural reflectivity and clarity that different types of glass possess, you may want to consider snapping some original photographs of different glass objects the next time you put your camera and macro photography lens to work.

Even if you’re not all that mesmerized by glass, you may want to learn the ins and outs of taking macro photographs of glass the right way. Because glass interacts with lighting and other objects in its vicinity, it’s crucial for you to understand the insider tips and tricks that experienced macro photographers employ when they shoot glass objects. Today’s macro photography tutorial by Gina Genis will teach you everything you need to know…



The great thing about taking macro photographs of glass objects is that you have so many different subjects to choose from. Bottles, glasses, jars, windows, ornaments, these are just a few of the items you probably have around your home or office. You can begin using some of the tips that Gina shared in today’s macro photography lesson to really make those glass objects shine during your next photo shoot.

Don’t forget the importance of exploiting the natural reflective power of certain glass items. With a few colorful items strategically placed around the glass that you plan to photography, you are sure to capture some images that will far exceed your expectations. Give the tips from this lesson a try and let us know how your photographs turn out!

Before you start shooting those glass macro photographs, however, take just a second to click on the Share button to tell other photographers about this cool lesson.

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